First Generation


1. Kenelm “Immigrant” Winslow, son of Edward Winslow and Magdalene Oliver, was born on Apr 30, 1599 in Droitwich , Worcestershire, England, died on Sep 12, 1672 in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts, and was buried on Sep 13, 1672 in Salem, Mass.

General Notes: KENELM’S IMMIGRATION TO AMERICA: Kenelm Winslow (1599-1672) our 1st immigrant Winslow ancestor to America: The Winslow family from England emerged in the early 14th century England as a loosely knit clan living in the vicinity of the hamlet of Winslow, in Buckinghamshire (50 miles northwest of London) from which they adopted their name. A brother of Edward Winslow (a Mayflower passenger and Plymouth diplomat and trade negotiator, and governor) , Kenelm was not in the 1627 Division of Cattle (a sharing of the common assets as the town of Plymouth grew). But he arrived at Plymouth before January 1, 1632-33 when he became a freeman (entitled to vote). Kenelm received various land grants and served on committees and juries.

According to some , land records in Plymouth he may have arrived in 1629 probably on the Winthrop fleet , but came directly from Salem to Plymouth.

One story of Kenelm’s arrival was he supposedly came to Plymouth May 15, 1629 from Gravesend in a party of 35 on the second Mayflower- not the same ship as the first one. “Mayflower” was apparently a very popular name for ships in those days! Another more plausible to me concept comes from the Plymouth Colony Records for 1631. In this, Kenelm may have come to Plymouth with his brother Josiah on the “White Angel” in 1631 See the Plymouth Records on Kenelm 1631 below. The Pilgrim Company and assorted others bound for Plymouth mostly came on the first Mayflower in1620, the Fortune in 1621, the Shallop and Sparrow in 1622, the Anne of London in 1623, and the second Mayflower in 1629. Of course, there were other ships that called at Plymouth too – the Little James, the Talbott, and the Handmaid, among others.


About 1641 Kenelm moved to Marshfield, where he had received a grant of land at the place called Green’s Harbor, March 5, 1637-38. This grant, originally made to Josiah, his brother, he shared with Love Brewster. He left the homestead to his son Nathaniel. He received other grants of land, and was one of the twenty-six original proprietors of Assonet, now Freetown, Massachusetts. He held various town offices; was deputy to the general court from 1642 to 1644 and from 1649 to 1653, eight years in all. He had considerable litigation, as the early court records show.

This homestead he gave to his second son, Nathaniel, and at his death it passed into the hands of his son, Kenelm, who m. Abigail Waterman; their son Kenelm, whom. Abigail Bourne, was obliged to sell the place in consequence of the failure in business of his younger brother Joseph, of Boston, which also involved his ruin. Other lands were granted to Kenelm Winslow at various times, and still others were purchased by him. He was one of the twenty-six original proprietors of Assonet (Freetown), Mass., purchased from the Indians 2 April, 1659, and received the 24th lot, a portion of which is still owned and occupied (1873) by Barnaby Winslow, his gr. gr. gr. grandson “to whom, by heirship, it has descended through successive generations of more than two hundred years.”

He married Elinor (Ellen) Worden Newton Adams June 1, 1634. She arrived on the Anne at Plymouth on July 10, 1623. Elinor was a young widow of 25 when she emigrated, marrying John Adams, a carpenter, who died in 1633. Adams had arrived on the Fortune in 1621. Elinor died December 5, 1681 at Marshfield, MA (where she is buried), “being eighty-three years old.”

Kenelm d. 13 Sept. 1672, seventy-three, Salem, Mass., where he had gone on business [Hon. Luther Hatch, of Marshfield]. According to Rev. L. R. Paige, he died there “apparently after a long sickness; for in his will dated five weeks earlier, 8 Aug. 1672, he describes himself as ‘being very sick and drawing nigh unto Death He may have been in Salem on a visit to Mrs. Elizabeth Corwin, daughter of his brother Edward Winslow, or perhaps, for the purpose of obtaining medical aid.”


Selected Records from Plymouth Colony for Kenelm Winslow

(3) 1631: (2) c. 1629: (1,2,3) Emigrated to Plymouth, MA. (1,2) Came with brother Josiah. (3) Although he first appears of record in Plymouth in 1633, he is paired in the early years with his brother Josiah WINSLOW, who is known to have arrived in 1631, and so we assume that Kenelm came at the same time. (1) Only about 1/3 of the Pilgrim Church of Leyden came over first, and in 1629 a long hindered portion of the original number came by way of Salem, in Puritan company, and proceeded thence to Plymouth. In was in the “Talbot” and the “Mayflower” (the same that came in 1620 to Plymouth) that 35 of the Leyden people smuggled themselves over. Some servants of the company came in the “Talbot,” but the Pilgrims came in the “Mayflower.” In 1631 Edward WINSLOW sent from London by the “White Angel” his brother Josiah.

(1,2,3b) 1632/3, 1 Jan: Admitted a Freeman to the Plymouth Colony.

(3b) 1632/3, 8 Jan: Francis EATON acknowledged that he had sold to Kenelm & Josias WYNSLOW the now dwelling house of

Frances.

(3b) 1633/4, 6 Jan: Samuel JENNY, the son of John JENNY, hath bound himself to Kenelm WINSLOW, of Plymouth, joiner.

(3b) 1636/7, 6 Jan: Granted “threescore acres of land lying upon the south side of the Eel River, above the great swamp.” This grant was made void upon a grant made to him at Green’s Harbor.

(1,2,3b) 1637/8, 5 Mar: (1,2) Received grant of land at Green’s Harbor. (2) originally made to his brother Josiah, and shared with Love

BREWSTER. (1,3b) He received, in partnership with Love BREWSTER, “all that parcel of land remaining of that neck of land lying on

the east side of the lands lately granted to Josias WINSLOW, at Greene’s Harbor.” (1) The lands were to be divided between Kenelm

WINSLOW and Love BREWSTER, provided that Kenelm was to have the part next adjoining his brother Josias.

(3b) 1639: Was in the Plymouth section of Plymouth Colony freemen, then erased and entered in the Marshfield section of the same list.

(1,2) 1641: (3) By 1643: (1,2,3) Moved to Marshfield, MA, formerly Green’s Harbor. (1,2) Home there described as “on a gentle

eminence by the sea, near the extremity of land lying between Green Harbor and South Rivers. This tract of the township was considered the Eden of the region. It was beautified with groves of majestic oaks and graceful walnuts, with the underground void of shrubbery.”

(3b) 1642, 7 Jun: Deputy for Marshfield to Plymouth General Court. (2) 1642-1644: Deputy to the General Court.

(1) There is a tradition among different branches of his descendants that he “possessed a high spirit or temper which brought him into litigation.”

(3b) 1647, 26 Oct: Mr. HATHERLY acknowledged in court that Helene, the wife of Kenelm WINSLOW, acknowledged her free

assent and consent to the sale of all such lands as her husband had sold unto Samuel STURDEVANT. Captain Miles STANDISH

deposed the same regarding her consent to sales to Henry SAMPSON.

(1,2) 1659, 2 Apr: One of 26 original proprietors of Assonet (Freetown), MA, purchased from the Indians. Received the 24th lot. (1) A

portion of the lot was still owned and occupied in 1873 by his 3rd great grandson Barnaby WINSLOW.

(3b) 1670, 29 May: In the Marshfield section of list of Plymouth Colony freemen.

(3a) 1672, 8 Aug: Kenelm WINSLOW Senior wrote his will, which he signed. Ordered that “what estate I have formerly settled on my

eldest son Kenelm” shall remain unaltered. Bequeathed to son Nathaniel the half of my farm that I last lived upon, as I gave him by a former deed of gift, the other half of the farm to my wife for the term of her natural life, and after the decease of my wife Eleanor

WINSLOW the said half of the farm shall return unto my son Nathaniel. Gave to son Job half of my land at Namassakett which is about 50 acres, and the other 50 acres or thereabouts to Kenelm BAKER my grandchild. Gave to my daughter Eleanor 5 pounds. My wife shall at her decease give unto Mary ADDAMS an equal portion of the goods and movables as to the rest of my grandchildren. Wife to be sole executrix and Major Josias WINSLOW and my son Kenelm WINSLOW to be overseers. (2) 1672: Left the homestead at Marshfield to his son Nathaniel.

(3a) 1672, 25 Sep: The inventory of the estate of Kenelm WINSLOW totaled 87 pounds, 15s. 4d. and included 1 Bible and 7 other

books valued at 12s. The real estate, unvalued, included one half of the dwelling house and housings and meadow lands and uplands belonging to the said farm he had lived on and now died possessed of in the town of Marshfield; one half of all the lands granted him by the Court with the ancient freemen which lies on the west side of Taunton River, either divided or to be divided hereafter; and one half of the portion of land granted by the Court to him and his brother Josias WINSLOW upon the account of their brother Gilbert WINSLOW

as he was a first comer.

(3a) 1673, 5 Jun: Will proved.

(3b) 1673/4, 4 Mar: Granted 100 acres at Teticutt, pursuant to an order of Jun 1662.


Kenelm: Cabinetmaker/Coffin Maker, Joiner, Planter

Based on “The Cabinetmakers of America”, is by Ethel Hall Bjerkie (Garden City, NY, Doubleday, 1957).

It is thought that John Alden and Winslow both worked at cabinetmaking, either in individual shops, or, as is more likely, together. In 1632 Alden had moved to Duxbury and in 1641 Winslow had moved to Marshfield, thus both were near to each other and close to Plymouth. There have been attributed to these two men, either working alone or together, some half dozen oaken court cupboards and twice as many chests made during the years 1650-70.

It is thought probable that the Governor Edward Winslow Chair, made about 1635 and owned by the Pilgrim Society at Plymouth, could have been the work of Kenelm. At the Metropolitan Museum of Art there is the Plymouth Chair, which shows the same type of serration about the seat and across the lower edge of the cresting, indicating the same makers as those of the Plymouth cupboards and chests. At Pilgrim Hall, Plymouth, there is a table believed to have been used by Governor Edward Winslow in his council chamber. It is eight feet long with a single gate at each end. The turnings are early. Could this have been made by Kenelm Winslow? or John Alden? (Antiques, Jan. 1930; Bradford; Willison)

The records of the Worshipful Company of Joiners and Ceilers of London provide the earliest written proof of a London connection to a New England joiner.1The joiner in question is Kenelm Winslow, who arrived in Plymouth Colony in about 1631.

Evidence of Kenelm’s London training is present in the Master’s and Wardens’ account books kept by the company from 1621 to 1828. In the relevant account citation the text reads: “Item [received] of Kenelm Winslow late the apprentice of Abraham Worthington a silver spoon and for his admission iij s iiij d” [3 shillings, 4 pence]. It was standard practice for an apprentice finishing his time to make a payment to the Company, along with a gift of a spoon2 (Fig. 1).

Fig. 1: Citation for Kenelm Winslow in the Masters’ and Wardens’ Account Book, Joiners’ & Ceilers’ Company of London, 1621-1828, Guildhall Library, City of London, Ms 8041 (FHL British Film 1068631). Courtesy of Worshipful Company of Joiners and Ceilers, Surrey, England. What is known of Winslow’s training? Guidelines established in 1563, in what has come to be known as the Statute of Artificers,3 detailed the various aspects of apprenticeship arrangements. One important distinction was the length of an apprenticeship and the minimum age at which an apprentice could finish his term:

…after the custom and order of the city of London for seven years at the least so the term and years of such apprentice do not expire afore such apprentice shall be of the age of 24 years…4


The record of Winslow’s admission is undated but follows records from August of 1624. Winslow was baptized May 3, 1599, in Droitwich, Worcestershire, a date that coincides with his admission to the Joiners’ Company approximately twenty-five years later. Assuming Winslow’s apprenticeship was a standard seven-year term, he would have been bound to Abraham Worthington around 1617. Unfortunately, the Master’s and Wardens’ account books that survive begin with the year 1621, leaving no record of his binding. Yet the name “Kenelm” is distinctive enough, and the dates agree so well that it is safe to proceed with the thinking that this is the Kenelm Winslow, joiner, who lived in Plymouth, and later, Marshfield, Massachusetts. In addition, there are no further known records of a Kenelm Winslow in London.

New England Families, Genealogical and Memorial: A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of Commonwealths and the Founding of a Nation, William Richard Cutter

William Winslow or Wynce- WINSLOW low was the first of the lineage as traced in England.

Children: John, of London, and Wyncelow

Hall; William, mentioned below.

(II) William (2) Winslow, son of William (I) Winslow or Wyncelow, had son Thomas, mentioned below.

(III) Thomas Winslow, son of William (2) Winslow, was of Burton, county Oxford, having lands also in Essex; was living in 1452 ; married Cecelia Tansley, called Lady Agnes.

(IV) William (3) Winslow, son of Thomas Winslow, was living in 1529. Children: Kenelm, mentioned below; Richard.

(V) Kenelm Winslow, son of William (3) Winslow, purchased in 1559 of Sir Richard Newport the estate of Newport’s Place, Kemp- sey, Worcestershire, and he had an older and very large estate in the same parish called Clerkenleap. He died in 1607, in the parish

of St. Andrew. He married Catherine.

His will was dated April 14, 1607, proved November 9, 1607.

(VI) Edward Winslow, only son of Kenelm Winslow, was born in the parish of St. Andrew, county Worcester, and died before 1631. He lived in Kempsey and Droitwich, same county. He married (first) Eleanor Pelham, of Droitwich, (second) at St. Bride’s Church, London, November 4, 1594, Magdalene Oliver, the records of whose family are found in the parish register of St. Peter’s, Droitwich. Children : Richard ; Edward, governor of Plymouth colony; John; Eleanor; Josiah; Gilbert, came in the “Mayflower” ; Elizabeth ; Magdalen; Kenelm, mentioned below.

(I) Kenelm (2) Winslow, son of Edward Winslow, was born at Droitwich, county Worcester, England, April 29, 1599, baptized at St. Peter’s Church, May 3, 1599. He was the immigrant ancestor, and came to Plymouth probably in 1629 with his brother Josiah, being admitted freeman January i, 1632-33. He was surveyor of Plymouth in 1640, and was fined ten shillings for neglecting the highways. About 1641 he moved to Marshfield, where he had received a grant of land at the place called Green’s Harbor, March 5, 1637-38. This grant, originally made to Josiah, his brother, he shared with Love Brewster. He left the homestead to his son Nathaniel. He received other grants of land, and was one of the twenty-six original proprietors of Assonet, now Freetown, Massachusetts. He was a joiner by trade as well as a planter. He held various town offices; was deputy to the general court from 1642 to 1644 and from 1649 to 1653, eight years in all. He had considerable litigation, as the early court records show. He died at Salem, whither he had gone on business, September 13, 1672, apparently after a long illness, for his will was dated five weeks earlier, August 8, 1672, and in it he says he is “very sick and drawing nigh unto death.” He married, in June, 1634, Eleanor Adams, widow of John Adams, of Plymouth. She died at Marshfield, and was buried there December 5, 1681, aged eighty-three. Children: Kenelm, born about 1635; Eleanor or Ellen, about 1637; Nathaniel, about 1639; Job, mentioned below.

(II) Lieutenant Job Winslow, son of Kenelm (2) Winslow, was born about 1641, died July 14, 1720, at Freetown, Massachusetts. He settled at Swansey, Massachusetts, about 1666. When King Philip’s war broke out in 1675, his house was burned. He seems to have been an early settler at Rochester, Massachusetts, as he was there about 1680; he soon moved to Freetown, for in 1686 he was a selectman there. In 1690 he was town clerk and grand juror; assessor in 1691, 1701, 1706 and 1711; deputy to the general court in 1692; moderator of town meeting, 1708 and 1711. He was a leading man of the church as well as in town affairs. He was a lieutenant of the militia, and a shipwright and planter. His will, dated November 12, 1/17, bequeathed land to the town now called the Winslow burying ground. He married Ruth , who survived him. Children, birth records of first six in Swansey, others in Freetown: William, November 16, 1674; Oliver, February 20, 1677; Ruth, September 13. 1678; Richard, March 6, 1680; Hope, May 29, 1681; Job, July 10, 1683; Joseph, about 1685; James, mentioned below ; Mary, April 2, 1689, died young; George, January 2, 1690-91 ; Jonathan. November 22, 1692; John, February 20, 1694-95; Elizabeth, 1696-97.

(III) James Winslow, son of Lieutenant Job Winslow, was born in Freetown, Massachusetts, May 9, 1687, died October 19, 1773. He moved from Freetown to Falmouth, Maine, about 1728, and settled on land granted to him in 1/28, on which he was to erect a mill. He owned a large tract at Portland (then Broad Bay), which he gave to his sons. He was the first Friend in Falmouth and “lent a most important support to the doctrines of that respectable people in this neighborhood.” He became a member, with Nathan and Benjamin Winslow, at a monthly meeting, May, 1751. He married (first) Elizabeth Carpenter, (second) intentions dated November 12, 1750, Ruth Gatchell, of Brunswick. Children, recorded in Freetown: Mary, June 20, 1709; Nathan, mentioned below; Job, March 30, 1715; Benjamin, June 19, 1717; Elizabeth, May 6, 1721; James, August 6, 1725; Sybil, October 3, 1727.

© Edward K. & Mildred True, and James D. True

Last Update March 3, 2001.

At the time of his marriage to Ellen, Kenelm put up security to pay James Adams, son of his new wife and her deceased husband, John Adams, 5 pounds when he became of age. Plymouth County records show that this sum was paid on 26 December 1651.

Kenelm became a “freeman” in Plymouth on 1 January 1632-33. In 1633, Kenelm and his brother, Josias, bought a dwelling from Francis Eaton with the records showing that Josias sold his half in 1634. After their marriage in June, 1634, Kenelm and Ellen lived in Marshfield and he received various land grants, including one in Yarmouth in 1640 where he participated in the settlement of that town. In 1642, and often later, he was a representative from Marshfield. On 1 June 1647, he was chosen constable in Marshfield and from 1649 onward was frequently a deputy in Marshfield.

“On March 7, 1653-54, Kenelm made a complaint against John Soule for speaking falsely against Kenelm’s daughter and ‘scandalizing’ her in carrying false reports between her and Josias Standish (PCR 3:46).”

Edward Winslow (Junior) 1595-1655 (sailed on the Mayflower)

Educated at King’s School, Worcester, apprenticed to London printer John Beadle in 1615. Posted to Lyden in Holland, where he assisted in printing Puritan leaflets. Set sail to Southampton 22 July 1620, and left Southampton on 5 August. The Mayflower arrived in Cape-in-Province town harbor, America, on 11 November.

Due to his education he was sent back to England as an agent of the colony. He returned to America in 1624. Governor in 1633, 1636, and 1644.

He became a commissioner for Cromwell, and died of a fever between Jamaica and Hispaniola in 1655, while on a Civil Commissioner’s errand for Cromwell. He was buried at sea.

Miss Thomas, in her memorials of Marshfield, p. 27, says: he ‘settled on a gentle eminence by the sea near the extremity of a neck of land lying between Green Harbor and South River. This tract of the township was considered the Eden of the region. It was beautified with groves of majestic oaks and graceful walnuts, with the underground void of tangled shrubbery. A few of these groves were standing within the memory of persons now living (1854) but all have fallen beneath the hand of the woodman.’ The homestead he left to his son Nathaniel, and at his death it passed into the hands of his son, Kenelm, who m. Abigail Waterman; their son Kenelm, who md Abigail Bourne, was obliged to sell the place in consequence of the failure in business of his younger brother Joseph of Boston, which also involved his ruin. “Other lands were granted to Kenelm Winslow at various times, and still others were purchased by him. He was one of the twenty-six original proprietors of Assonet (Freetown), Mass., purchased from the Indians 2 Apr 1659 and received the twenty-fourth lot, a portion of which is still or was lately owned and occupied (1873) by Barnabas Winslow, his gr. gr. gr. grandson ‘to whom, by heirship, it has descended through successive generations of more than two hundred years.’

“The following letter from Rev. Edward C. Towne to John Winslow, of Brooklyn, is interesting and suggestive, as relating to the time of and circumstances attending his arrival at Plymouth. Mr. Towne had previously published a letter in the New York Tribune, endorsing the discrimination that should be made between the Pilgrims and Puritans, in studies of colonial history. “John Winslow, Dear Sir: It gives me pleasure to answer your note of May 6th. Of Gov. Edward Winslow’s four brothers–John, born April, 1597; Kenelm, born April, 1599; Gilbert, born October 1600; and Josiah, born February, 1605; Kenelm and Josiah ‘arrived at Plymouth before 1632, and both settled at Marshfield’ (Young’s Chronicles of the Pilgrims, p. 275). Kenelm died at Salem, 1672, but was while on a visit there. He was from first to last one of the Pilgrims, within the limits of the Old Colony. The exact date of his arrival from England is not known. If he came in 1629, in Puritan company, and perhaps made some stay at Salem before proceeding to Plymouth, it would still be consistent with his being an original Pilgrim with the Mayflower people and their delayed companions. Only about one-third of the Pilgrim Church of Leyden came over at first, and in 1629 a long hindered portion of the original number came by way of Salem, in Puritan company, and proceeded thence to Plymouth. The Puritan ships, spoken of in my note to the Tribune–the Talbot, George, and Lion–were directly followed by three more–the Pilgrim, Four Sisters and the Mayflower (the same that in 1620 came to Plymouth). It was in the Talbot and the Mayflower that 35 of the Leyden people smuggled themselves over. Gilbert had come with Edward in the Mayflower, 1620, and John the next year in the Fortune, with the second detachment of the Pilgrims. it is likely that Kenelm followed in their track, however he may have taken passage of Puritan company. Possibly he came in the Mayflower itself in 1629 when it formed part of the Puritan Expedition. The next year also the old Mayflower was one of the fleet which brought over Winthrop and his large company and your ancestor may have taken advantage of the opportunity. But however he came it was as a Pilgrim to join the Old Colony. Either he or his son Kenelm got a tract of land in Rhode Island where many of his descendants lived and died. “Of the two ships of 1829 which brought Pilgrims, it must have been the Mayflower rather than the Talbot on which your ancestor came; the record states that ‘some servants’ of the Pilgrim company were sent in the Talbot, ‘but these [the Pilgrims] come in the Mayflower.’ No doubt your ancestor made a point , if he had a chance to do so, of coming over in the original Pilgrim ship. The probability is very great also that he took advantage of the first good opportunity, that of 1629, and that he proceeded directly to Plymouth, and was not even transiently a resident at Salem. His name does not appear in the lists of freemen within the limits of the Puritan Colony. “In Bradford it is mentioned that in 1631, Edward Winslow sent from London by the White Angel his brother Josiah, and that then began his employment with the Plymouth people. As Josiah was six years younger than Kenelm, it may be presumed that the latter had already come over, and that Josiah was taken as the only brother left. This leaves it almost certain, with the previous probabilities, that it was by the Mayflower, in 1629, that your ancestor came over to join the Plymouth pilgrims. He came to Marshfield on account, doubtless, of his brother Edward’s estate, and as Edward was a good deal engaged with Puritans a well as Pilgrims, in the agencies which he undertook in England, it is likely that Kenelm had more or less business and acquaintance among the Puritans and that in this way he was on a visit to Salem at the time of his death. When I next see the Whitmans of Plymouth, who are descendants of Edward Winslow, I will make further inquiry, and will also look at one or two books which I have not at hand here. It is unlikely however, that any thing can be added to the probable conclusions that your ancestor, though not at first, yet came in the Mayflower.”

Kenelm’s father was a rich salt boiler in the Droitwich area of England. Salt being in great demand at the time for seasoning and meat preserving prove to be lucrative business. Kenelm’s family wealth allow him a good education by the standards of the time. Little is know of Kenelm’s earlier years, prior to him coming to America, but he must have had exposure to the family business and learn the trade of joiner he used in later life.

Despite this bad year, Kenelm Winslow continued to hold important town and colony offices for another decade. His last year as deputy was 1653, and he virtually disappears from public view at that time, although he lived for another two decades. This was about the time that his two elder and more prominent brothers, Edward and John, left Plymouth Colony; perhaps Kenelm owed his limited success to the presence of these brothers, and once they were gone his own abilities were not sufficient to maintain himself at this level.

Granted one hundred acres at Teticutt, 4 March 1673/4 (pursuant to an order of June 1662) [ PCR 5:141]. In his will, dated 8 August 1672 and proved 5 June 1673, “Kenelm Winslow Senior’s wife to be sole executrix and “Major Josias Winslow and my son Kenelm Winslow” to be overseers [ MD 24:41-42, citing PCPR 3:1:56]. The inventory of the estate of Kenelm Winslow, taken 25 September 1672, totaled £87 15s. 4d.; the real estate, unvalued, followed: “one half of the dwelling house and housings and meadow lands and uplands belonging to the said farm he had lived on and now died possessed of in the town of Marshfield”; “one half of all the lands granted him by the Court with the ancient freemen which lieth on the west side of Taunton River either divided or to be divided hereafter”; and “one half of the portion of land granted by the court to him and his brother Josias Winslow upon the account of their brother Gilbert Winslow as he was a first comer” [ MD 24:42, citing PCPR 3:1:57].

Kathy Meyers comment about Kenelm’s house: I visited the Kenelm Winslow house in Marshfield in 1985. In the 1970s I used to correspond with its former owner, Bishop Lawrence. When he sold the house, we received a mailing from the realtor handling the sale. He used it for many years as a summer home. At the time we visited people by the name of Ozzilinski owned it and were working on a restoration. The house is supposedly “haunted”. We were told the ghost’s name is Chloe and she was apparently a Winslow, kept in the attic. Interesting stuff!! Ozzilinski’s sold it to a developer who I understand has built houses right up to it. When I saw it the original acreage was in tact and you could walk down to the river.

In 1633, Kenelm and his brother, Josias, bought a dwelling in Marshfield, MA from Francis Eaton with the records showing that Josias sold his half in 1634.

Despite these brushes with the law, Kenelm Winslow continued to hold important town and colony offices for a decade. His last year as deputy was 1653, and then he virtually disappears from public view at that time, although he lived for another two decades.

At the time of his marriage to Ellen, Kenelm put up security to pay James Adams, son of his new wife and her deceased husband, John Adams, 5 pounds when he became of age. Plymouth County records show that this sum was paid on 26 December 1651.

Kenelm became a “freeman” in Plymouth on 1 January 1632-33. In 1633, Kenelm and his brother, Josias, bought a dwelling from Francis Eaton with the records showing that Josias sold his half in 1634. After their marriage in June, 1634, Kenelm and Ellen lived in Marshfield and he received various land grants, including one in Yarmouth in 1640 where he participated in the settlement of that town. In 1642, and often later, he was a representative from Marshfield. On 1 June 1647, he was chosen constable in Marshfield and from 1649 onward was frequently a deputy in Marshfield.

According to

Plymouth Colony, Its History and Peoples by Stratton, p 376 and 377, Kenelm was involved in several disputes which were settled by the courts;

“Winslow Memorial”, by David P. and Frances K. Holton, 1887, 1888,

“The Great Migration Begins”, by R. C. Anderson, 1995 (FHL929.1 W893)

“The following letter from Rev. Edward C. Towne to John Winslow, of Brooklyn, is interesting and suggestive, as relating to the time of and circumstances attending his arrival at Plymouth. Mr. Towne had previously published a letter in the New York Tribune, endorsing the discrimination that should be made between the Pilgrims and Puritans, in studies of colonial history.

“John Winslow, Dear Sir: It gives me pleasure to answer your note of May 6th. Of Gov. Edward Winslow’s four brothers–John, born April, 1597; Kenelm, born April, 1599; Gilbert, born October 1600; and Josiah, born February, 1605; Kenelm and Josiah ‘arrived at Plymouth before 1632, and both settled at Marshfield’ (Young’s Chronicles of the Pilgrims, p. 275). Kenelm died at Salem, 1672, but was while on a visit there. He was from first to last one of the Pilgrims, within the limits of the Old Colony. The exact date of his arrival from England is not known. If he came in 1629, in Puritan company, and perhaps made some stay at Salem before proceeding to Plymouth, it would still be consistent with his being an original Pilgrim with the Mayflower people and their delayed companions. Only about one-third of the Pilgrim Church of Leyden came over at first, and in 1629 a long hindered portion of the original number came by way of Salem, in Puritan company, and proceeded thence to Plymouth. The Puritan ships, spoken of in my note to the Tribune–the Talbot, George, and Lion–were directly followed by three more–the Pilgrim, Four Sisters and the Mayflower (the same that in 1620 came to Plymouth). It was in the Talbot and the Mayflower that 35 of the Leyden people smuggled themselves over. Gilbert had come with Edward in the Mayflower, 1620, and John the next year in the Fortune, with the second detachment of the Pilgrims. it is likely that Kenelm followed in their track, however he may have taken passage of Puritan company. Possibly he came in the Mayflower itself in 1629 when it formed part of the Puritan Expedition. The next year also the old Mayflower was one of the fleet which brought over Winthrop and his large company and your ancestor may have taken advantage of the opportunity. But however he came it was as a Pilgrim to join the Old Colony. Either he or his son Kenelm got a tract of land in Rhode Island where many of his descendants lived and died.

“Of the two ships of 1829 which brought Pilgrims, it must have been the Mayflower rather than the Talbot on which your ancestor came; the record states that ‘some servants’ of the Pilgrim company were sent in the Talbot, ‘but these [the Pilgrims] come in the Mayflower.’ No doubt your ancestor made a point , if he had a chance to do so, of coming over in the original Pilgrim ship. The probability is very great also that he took advantage of the first good opportunity, that of 1629, and that he proceeded directly to Plymouth, and was not even transiently a resident at Salem. His name does not appear in the lists of freemen within the limits of the Puritan Colony.

“In Bradford it is mentioned that in 1631, Edward Winslow sent from London by the White Angel his brother Josiah, and that then began his employment with the Plymouth people. As Josiah was six years younger than Kenelm, it may be presumed that the latter had already come over, and that Josiah was taken as the only brother left. This leaves it almost certain, with the previous probabilities, that it was by the Mayflower, in 1629, that your ancestor came over to join the Plymouth pilgrims. He came to Marshfield on account, doubtless, of his brother Edward’s estate, and as Edward was a good deal engaged with Puritans a well as Pilgrims, in the agencies which he undertook in England, it is likely that Kenelm had more or less business and acquaintance among the Puritans and that in this way he was on a visit to Salem at the time of his death. When I next see the Whitmans of Plymouth, who are descendants of Edward Winslow, I will make further inquiry, and will also look at one or two books which I have not at hand here. It is unlikely however, that any thing can be added to the probable conclusions that your ancestor, though not at first, yet came in the Mayflower.”

“Massachusetts Genealogies” by Cutter and Adams,

“The Great Migration…”


excerpts from Connecting a London-Trained Joiner to 1630s Plymouth Colony

The discovery of Kenelm Winslow’s admission to the Worshipful Company of Ceilers and Joyners of London provide the earliest written proof of a London connection to a New England joiner.1 The joiner in question is Kenelm Winslow, who arrived in Plymouth Colony in about 1631.

Evidence of Kenelm’s London training is present in the Master’s and Wardens’ account books kept by the company from 1621 to 1828. In the relevant account citation the text reads: “Item [received] of Kenelm Winslow late the apprentice of Abraham Worthington a silver spoon and for his admission iij s iiij d” [3 shillings, 4 pence]. It was standard practice for an apprentice finishing his time to make a payment to the Company, along with a gift of a spoon2 (Fig. 1).

Fig. 1: Citation for Kenelm Winslow in the Masters’ and Wardens’ Account Book, Joiners’ & Ceilers’ Company of London, 1621-1828, Guildhall Library, City of London, Ms 8041 (FHL British Film 1068631). Courtesy of Worshipful Company of Joiners and Ceilers, Surrey, England. is known of Winslow’s training? Guidelines established in 1563, in what has come to be known as the Statute of Artificers,3 detailed the various aspects of apprenticeship arrangements. One important distinction was the length of an apprenticeship and the minimum age at which an apprentice could finish his term:

…after the custom and order of the city of London for seven years at the least so the term and years of such apprentice do not expire afore such apprentice shall be of the age of 24 years…4


The record of Winslow’s admission is undated but follows records from August of 1624. Winslow was baptized May 3, 1599, in Droitwich, Worcestershire, a date that coincides with his admission to the Joiners’ Company approximately twenty-five years later. Assuming Winslow’s apprenticeship was a standard seven-year term, he would have been bound to Abraham Worthington around 1617. Unfortunately, the Master’s and Wardens’ account books that survive begin with the year 1621, leaving no record of his binding.

Edward Winslow was quite prominent in the government in Plymouth, serving as assistant governor and governor before returning permanently to England by 1646.5

Although other joiners came to New England ahead of Kenelm Winslow, he is the first for whom there is a written record that indicates he was practicing his trade. Within a few years he apparently had enough work to bring on an apprentice. On January 1633/4, Samuel Jenny of Plymouth entered into a contract with Kenelm to learn the “joyners occupation.” The assumption is that Winslow could not teach the boy the trade unless he had enough work to maintain him.

The contract is as follows:

Jan 6 1633 Sam Jenny, the son of John Jenny, by the consent of the said John, hath bound himself apprentice to Kenelm Winslow, of Plymouth, joyner, for the full term of four years, during which time the said Samuel shall doe faithful service, as becometh an apprentice, to the said Kenelm. Also the said Kenelm shall exercise the said Samuell in the joyners occupacon, and shall doe his best to instruct him in his said trade, and at the end of his time shall double appell the said Samuell. But if the said Kenelm shall remove his dwelling from Plymouth, or the liberties thereof, then this covt to be void 6

Winslow Memorial

Kenelm Winslow

1. KENELM (1) Winslow, third son and fourth child of Edward Winslow and Magdalene (Ollyver) of Droitwich, Worcestershire, Eng., was born at that place, on Sunday, 29 April, 1599, and baptized the Thursday following, 3May, 1599; he “dyed at Salem and was buried there 13 Sept., 1672,” ‘. 73 years. He came to Plymouth, probably in 1629 with his brother Josiah1, and was admitted freeman, 1 Jan. 1632-3. In 1640, he was chosen Surveyor in Town of Plymouth, but neglecting highways is fined ten shillings [Ply. Col. Rec.,II, p. 1]. He removed to Marshfield about 1641, having previously received a grant of land at that place, then called Green’s Harbor, 5 Mar. 1637-8: “all that parcel of land remaining of that neck of land lying on the east side of the lands lately granted to Josias Winslow, at Green’s Harbor, are granted to Kenelm Winslow and Love Brewster, to be divided betwixt them, provided that Kenelm Winslow have that part next adjoining to his brother Josias, upon the conditions the lands there are granted upon” [Plym. Col. Rec., I,78]. Miss Thomas, in her memorials of Marshfield, p. 27, says: he “settled on a gentle eminence by the sea, near the extremity of a neck of land lying between Green Harbor and South Rivers. This tract of the township was considered the Eden of the region. It was beautified with groves of majestic oaks and graceful walnuts, with the underground void of tangled shrubbery. A few of these groves were standing within the memory of persons now living(1854) but all have fallen beneath the hand of the woodman.” This homestead he gave to his second son, Nathaniel2, and at his death it passed into the hands of his son, Kenelm3, who m. Abigail Waterman; their son Kenelm4, whom. Abigail Bourne, was obliged to sell the place in consequence of the failure in business of his younger brother Joseph4, of Boston, which also involved his ruin. Other lands were granted to Kenelm1 Winslow at various times, and still others were purchased by him. He was one of the twenty-six original proprietors of Assonet (Freetown), Mass., purchased from the Indians 2 April, 1659, and received the 24th lot, a portion of which is still owned and occupied (1873) by Barnaby4 Winslow, his gr. gr. gr. grandson “to whom, by heirship, it has descended through successive generations of more than two hundred years.” Mr. Winslow was styled “joiner,” 6 Jan. 1633-4, when Samuel Jenney was indented to him as an apprentice; but he is elsewhere and generally called a “planter” and was somewhat engaged in the shipping interest. Besides serving his townsmen in minor offices, he was deputy, or representative, in the general court, 1642-44, and 1649-53, eight years.[Plym. Col. Rec.]

There is, among different branches of his descendants, a tradition that he possessed a high spirit or temper which brought him into litigation.

He m. June, 1634, Eleanor Adams, widow of John Adams, of Plymouth.1 She survived him and d. at Marshfield, Mass., where she was buried 5 Dec. 1681, “being eighty-three years old.” He d. 13 Sept. 1672, ‘. seventy-three, Salem, Mass., where he had gone on business [Hon. Luther Hatch, of Marshfield]. According to Rev. L. R. Paige, he died there “apparently after a long sickness; for in his will dated five weeks earlier, 8 Aug. 1672, he describes himself as ‘being very sick and drawing nigh unto Death He may have been in Salem on a visit to Mrs. Elizabeth Corwin, [Curwen] daughter of his brother Edward1 Winslow, or perhaps, for the purpose of obtaining medical aid.”

Their children were:

1. KENELM, [6] b. abt. 1635; d. 11 Nov. 1715; m. Mercy Worden; m. 2d, Damaris (???).

2. ELEANOR or ELLEN, [18] b. abt. 1637; d. 27 Aug. 1676; m. Samuel Baker.

3. NATHANIEL, [27] b. abt. 1639; d. 1 Dec. 1719; m. Faith Miller.

4. JOB, [36] b. abt. 1641; d. 14 July, 1720; m. Ruth (???).

Kenelm is a family name of the Digby family and I think you will find that back about the time of Guy Fawkes, the families intermarried. The name tne was Throckmorton. I am a Digby descendant so the name caught my eye. There is a book which may give you some clues. “The Gunpowder Plot” by Antonia Fraser (English) I seem to recall has some info in it which may give you some leads. In the meantime I’ll see what I can dig up. I am sure the coming together of these two names is no coincidence. Best of luck. Penny

Some sources say Kenelm Winslow arrived in Plymouth Colony in 1629 or 1630, about nine years after his older brother had made his journey. Plymouth records say that Kenelm came with Josiah on the White Angel in 1631. Marshfield History Book (1990) says that he arrived on the second Mayflower, in 1630. A 1957 article about Kenelm in “The Cabinet Makers of America” reports that he was a passenger on the Mayflower, on her second voyage to the Colonies. This voyage of the Mayflower departed from London in March 1629 and arrived in Salem on May 15 (or June 30), with many Puritans for the Bay company and a few passengers for for Plymouth. Kenelm was listed a “coffin maker” in the ship’s records, a term synonymous with cabinetmaker.

Kenelm and Ellen Winslow remained in Plymouth until they removed permanently to Marshfield in 1641, and settled on his 100 acre Marshfield grant Kenelm Winslow followed his brother, Edward, to the Marshfield area in 1641 when he was granted, in 1636,100 acres of land in the spectacularly beautiful area at the seaward end of Marshfield Neck Road. ( Marshfield Neck Road is Route 139 as it runs east from downtown Marshfield to Winslow Street today). There were five original settlers to this area called Rexhame, those being Joseph Beadle, Kenelm Winslow, Josiah Winslow, and Thomas Bourne. Kenelm Winslow was the third settler in Rexhame. Kenelm built himself a house on a prime spot, ( what is now called 123 Winslow Street). Their new home nestled on the southwest shoulder of the hill. This early house was later enlarged into the elegant home which stands there today. It is magnificent, with a huge central chimney, six fireplaces, traditional center doorway framed with two windows on each side, and five windows across the second story. A third-story garret once housed the family spinning equipment, while the servant or slave quarters were located in the rear part of the second floor. The house faces due south and commands a sweeping view of the Green Harbor River, the ocean off Ocean Bluff and Brant Rock, and the South River valley to the west. Kenelm created a far-reaching farm here, clearing the fields for tillage and pasturing his cattle on the fertile land. He laid out an extensive English park around his home. For over 200 years there were only the 5 farms on Rexhane Hill, those belonging to the Beadle, Kenelm, Josiah, Bourne, and Waterman families. Kenelm and Ellen Adams Winslow had four children, all of whom grew up at the house on Rexhame Hill. Two sons moved away. A daughter, Ellen, married Samuel Baker of Marshfield.

Nathaniel, born in 1639, married Faith Miller of Yarmouth and succeeded to the Kenelm Winslow homestead. The Kenelm Winslow family homestead passed to his son Nathaniel, his son Kenelm (b. 1675), his son Kenelm, and his son Kenelm. This last son moved to Kennebec County, ME. where he established a long line of Winslows still found today (1990) in Lincoln and Waldo Counties, ME. The Kenelm Winslow Marshfield (Rexhame) homestead passed through in-laws to Captain Asa Waterman in 1783, and thence to Captain Curtis Goodsell in 1864. Sarah Sherrill bought the Winslow place from Edward Ames in 1906 and it passed to Carrie Sherrill in 1920 and to her brother Edgar Sherrill. In 1939 Episcopal Bishop Frederic Lawrence and his wife Katherine, bought the house which had been held for four years by the Rockland Trust Company. At that time there were about 23 acres of land in the estate. Lawrence sold the place to Richard Osslinski who in turn sold to Stephen Whoriskey in 1988. The old Kenelm Winslow Estate is now divided into small house lots with new homes. Streets on the property are appropriately named Sherrill Road and Eden Road. The original house has been considerably altered, although covenants drawn up by the Marshfield Historical Commission and the planning board have attempted to set standards of historic preservation.

Kenelm Winslow from NEHGS

ORIGIN: Droitwich, Worcestershire

MIGRATION: 1631

FIRST RESIDENCE: Plymouth

REMOVES: Marshfield by 1643

OCCUPATION: Joiner. On 6 January 1633/4 “Sam[uel] Jenny, the son of John Jenny, hath bound himself apprentice to Kenelm Winslow, of Plymouth, joiner” [ PCR 1:24].

FREEMAN: Admitted 1 January 1632/3 [ PCR 1:4, 5]. In list of Plymouth Colony freemen of 7 March 1636/7 [ PCR 1:52]. In Plymouth section of 1639 Plymouth Colony list of freemen [ PCR 8:173], then erased and entered in Marshfield section of same list [ PCR 8:177, 195]. In Marshfield section of 1658 and 29 May 1670 lists of Plymouth Colony freemen [ PCR 5:277, 8:201].

EDUCATION: He signed his will. His inventory included “1 Bible and 7 other books” valued at 12s.

OFFICES: Plymouth Colony assessor, 27 March 1634 [ PCR 1:26]. Deputy for Marshfield to Plymouth General Court, 7 June 1642, 27 September 1642, 29 August 1643, 10 October 1643, 5 June 1644, 20 August 1644, 6 June 1649, 4 June 1650, 5 June 1651, 7 June 1652, 7 June 1653 [ PCR 2:40, 46, 60, 63, 72, 75, 144, 154, 168, PCR 3:9, 32]. Committee on laborers’ wages, 5 January 1635/6 [ PCR 2:36]. Coroner’s jury, 3 May 1653, 14 February 1654/5 [ PCR 3:28, 70]. Grand jury, 7 March 1636/7, 5 June 1638, 6 June 1654 [ PCR 1:54, 87, 3:49]. Committee on provisions for the governor, 3 June 1657 [ PCR 3:120]. Petit jury, 7 June 1636, 4 October 1636 [ PCR 1:42, 44]. Plymouth member of colony committee on highways, 5 March 1638/9 [ PCR 1:117].

On 1 December 1640 “Kenelm Winslow, being elected surveyor of the highways for the town of Plymouth, and neglecting the same, is fined 10s.” [ PCR 2:4]. Marshfield constable, 1 June 1647 [ PCR 2:115].

In Marshfield section of 1643 Plymouth Colony list of men able to bear arms [ PCR 8:196].

ESTATE: Assessed 12s. in Plymouth tax list of 25 March 1633, and 18s. in list of 27 March 1634 [ PCR 1:11, 28].

On 8 January 1632/3 “Francis Eaton acknowledgeth that he hath sold to Kenelm & Josias Wynslow the now dwelling house of the said Francis” [ PCR 1:8]. Granted mowing ground, 14 March 1635/6, 20 March 1636/7 [ PCR 1:40, 55]. Granted “threescore acres of land lying upon the south side of the Eel River, above the great swamp…. This grant was made void upon a grant made to him at Green’s Harbor,” 6 January 1636/7 [ PCR 1:47]. On 5 February 1637/8 “Kenelm Winslow requesteth a grant of lands at Green’s Harbor” [ PCR 1:76], and on 5 March 1637/8 he received, in partnership with Love Brewster, “all that parcel of land remaining of that neck of land lying on the east side of the lands lately granted to Josias Winslow, at Greene’s Harbor” [ PCR 1:78, 111].

On 26 October 1647 “Mr. Hatherley here in Court acknowledgeth that Helene, the wife of Kenelm Winslow, acknowledgeth her free assent and consent to the sale of all such lands as her husband had sold unto Samuell Sturdevant. Captain Miles Standish” deposed the same regarding her consent to sales to Henry Sampson [ PCR 2:118-19].

Granted one hundred acres at Teticutt, 4 March 1673/4 (pursuant to an order of June 1662) [ PCR 5:141].

In his will, dated 8 August 1672 and proved 5 June 1673, “Kenelm Winslow Senior” ordered that “what estate I have formerly settled on my eldest son Kenelm … shall remain unaltered” and bequeathed to “my son Nathaniel … the half of my farm that I last lived upon … as I gave him by a former deed of gift”; “and the other half of the farm to my wife, for the term of her natural life” and “after the decease of my wife Eleanor Winslow the said half of the farm shall return unto my son Nathaniel”; to “my son Job … half of my land at Namassakett which is about fifty acres … and the other fifty acres or thereabouts unto Kenelm Baker my grandchild”; to “my daughter Eleanor” £5; “my wife shall at her decease give unto Mary Addams an equal portion of the goods and movables as to the rest of my grandchildren”; wife to be sole executrix and “Major Josias Winslow and my son Kenelm Winslow” to be overseers [ MD 24:41-42, citing PCPR 3:1:56].

The inventory of the estate of Kenelm Winslow, taken 25 September 1672, totaled £87 15s. 4d.; the real estate, unvalued, followed: “one half of the dwelling house and housings and meadow lands and uplands belonging to the said farm he had lived on and now died possessed of in the town of Marshfield”; “one half of all the lands granted him by the Court with the ancient freemen which lieth on the west side of Taunton River either divided or to be divided hereafter”; and “one half of the portion of land granted by the court to him and his brother Josias Winslow upon the account of their brother Gilbert Winslow as he was a first comer” [ MD 24:42, citing PCPR 3:1:57].

BIRTH: Baptized Droitwich, Worcestershire, 3 May 1599, son of Edward and Magdalen (Oliver) Winslow [ NEHGR 4:297, 21:210].

DEATH: Buried at Salem 13 September 1672 [ MarVR 427].

MARRIAGE: Plymouth in June 1634 “Ellen Adams” [ PCR 1:30]; she was Ellen Newton , widow of John Adams [ TAG 55:212-13]; she was buried at Marshfield 5 December 1681, aged 83 [ MD 2:250; MarVR 13].

CHILDREN: 

i KENELM, b. say 1635; m. (1) by 1668 Mercy Worden (eldest child b. Scituate 9 August 1668, father stated to be of Yarmouth; in her will of 6 March 1686[/7] Mary Worden, widow, of Yarmouth bequeathed to daughter Mercy Winslow [ MD 3:201-02, citing BarnPR 1:12]); m. (2) by 1693 Damaris Eames, daughter of Mark Eames (in his will of 12 July 1693 Mark Eames of Marshfield bequeathed to “daughter Damaris Winslow” [ Gen Adv 3:93-94, citing PPR 1:172]).

ii ELLEN, b. say 1636; m. Marshfield 20 [December 1656 Samuel Baker] (the marriage record as published is missing all but the name of the bride and the day of the event; the month and the year are suggested by the preceding marriage record, which was for November 1656, and the date of birth of the first child, on 23 March 1657/8 [ MarVR 2, 4]). On 7 March 1653/4 “Kenelm Winslow complained against John Soule for speaking falsely of and scandalizing his daughter in carrying diverse false reports betwixt Josias Standish and her; the which complaint, at the request of G[e]orge Soule, father of the said John Soule, was referred until another Court, to be tried by a jury of twelve of his equals” [ PCR 3:46-47].

iii NATHANIEL, b. say 1639; m. Marshfield 3 August 1664 Faith Miller [ MarVR 5].

iv JOB, b. say 1641; m. by 1674 Ruth _____ (eldest known child b. Swansea 16 November 1674 [ SwVR 21]). (In 1914 Richard Henry Greene rejected the claim that Ruth was daughter of Daniel Cole; he examined several other possibilities, including a placement in the family of STEPHEN HOPKINS , but came to no firm conclusion [ NYGBR 45:2-8; see also MF 6:7, 11].)

ASSOCIATIONS: Brother of Edward Winslow, Gilbert Winslow, John Winslow and Josiah Winslow.

COMMENTS: Although Kenelm Winslow first appears of record in Plymouth in the tax list of 25 March 1633, and was therefore certainly in New England by 1632, he is paired in the early years with his brother Josiah Winslow, who is known to have arrived in 1631, and so we assume that Kenelm came at the same time.

On 4 June 1645 “Kenelm Winslow complained that he had injustice, in that he could not be heard in the suit betwixt John Maynard and himself”; after investigation by the court, he “was committed to prison and fined £10,” whereupon he reversed himself and was released from prison and the fine was eventually remitted [ PCR 2:85].

On 5 May 1645/6 “upon hearing of the cause betwixt Roger Chaundler and Kenelm Winslow, for his daughter’s clothes, which the said Kenelm detaineth, upon pretense of some further service which he required of her, whereunto the said Roger utterly refused to consent, it is ordered by the Court, that the said Kenelm Winslow shall deliver the maid her clothes without any further delay” [ PCR 2:98].

On the same day “Kenelm Winslow, for opprobrious words against the church of Marshfeild, saying they were all liars, &c., was ordered by the Court to find sureties for his good behavior, which he refusing to do, was committed to prison, where he remained until the General Court following” [ PCR 2:98].

Despite this bad year, Kenelm Winslow continued to hold important town and colony offices for another decade. His last year as deputy was 1653, and he virtually disappears from public view at that time, although he lived for another two decades. This was about the time that his two elder and more prominent brothers, Edward and John, left Plymouth Colony; perhaps Kenelm owed his limited success to the presence of these brothers, and once they were gone his own abilities were not sufficient to maintain himself at this level.

Winslow Reunion 9/7/1919

The annual reunion of the Winslow family was held on the lawn surrounding the residence of Hon R. C. Winslow of this place on Thursday September 7, 1919 , and about 200 were present. Representatives of this pioneer family were here from Benezette, Reynoldsville, Driftwood, DuBois, and other points.

The Citizens’ Band discoursed music during the forenoon and at the noon hour long lines of tables were spread with a bountiful dinner.

Following the banquet, there was some speech-making, the chairman of the meeting being Edward J Winslow of Benezette. Miss Florence Fishermad the address of Welcome, and George W. Porter gave a talk on “The Past, Present, and Future”. W. M. Gillispie Esq, spoke on “The Lessons Our Fathers Taught Us”.

After voting to hold the next reunion at Punxsutawney, the following officers were elected: President – George W Porter; Vice President–William Winslow, Benezette; Treasurer–Raymond Winslow; Secretary–W. W. Winslow, Esq.

George W Porter’s address:

“I wish to speak of two historic periods that have taken place in Punxsutawney.

This town, perhaps this very spot on which we stand, was where the Six Nations ( the French called them the Iroquois) held their councils of war and plotted the destruction of the white man’s home. It is supposed that Logan, the chief of the Mingos, delivered his celebrated speech at this place. Here it was they danced around their council fires and displayed the scalps of the unfortunate victims captured in war. Time has wrought a mighty change and not a vestige of that ancient race is with us today; the red man who chased the panting deer over these hills and through these valleys has gone never to return; his tomahawk has been buried and his war whoop is heard no more; the smoke from his wigwam mingled with the passing clouds years ago, and his council fires have gone out forever.

A higher civilization is with us today, and we meet not with our hands reeking with the blood from some innocent victim, but to take each other by the hand and become acquainted and speak of the good qualities of the Winslow family. We do not claim to be all saints, but I have not heard of the Winslow blood stealing a horse, robbing a bank, or breaking in jail.

We find among our numerous progeny many men of courage, intelligence, and ability, and among our ladies both young and old intellect and refinement, and if you would view the beauties of the forest or look upon the fair faces of Patigonians, or travel from the east to the west, from the north to the south, you would not find more beautiful women than those who have the Winslow blood coursing through their veins.

For a few moments allow me to speak of our ancestors. It is not best to trace back too far, as some one said we might run into a robber such a Robin Hood, a generous robber, who stole from the rich and gave to the poor.

Kenelm, our ancestor, was born in England in 1599. He did not come over on the first trip of the Mayflower, but came a few years after. His brother Edward landed with the Plymouth fathers in 1620, and he was a leading light among them. His wife died a short time after they landed and a few months after his wife died he married Susan White, a widow, who was the mother to her first husband of the first white child born in New England. Kenelm Winslow had several children. The youngest son, named Job, born in 1631. He was a civil as well as an army officer. Job had eight children, one whose name was James, our ancestor, born in 1687. He moved to Maine in 1728, was a farmer and a Quaker in belief. He had a son named James born in 1725, just 100 years before my mother was born. He had a family of 12 children and was also a Quaker in belief. He was the father of Carpenter Winslow, who lies in the old cemetery and was buried in 1827. He is the ancestor of all the Winslows in this and surrounding counties. He was born in 1766, ten years before the Revolution. He had nine sons, five of whom came with him on a vessel to Baltimore and from thence by the way of Clearfield to Punxsutawney, and here we are today, proud of our ancestors, for we find in history a long list of eminent men, ministers, missionaries and statesmen and from the days of Edward down through the brilliant career of Rear Admiral Winslow who commanded the Kearsage, cruising along the coast of France. He found in port the rebel gunboat Alabama. The commander of the Alabama sent Winslow a challenge which was readily accepted. Sailing into neutral waters they had a terrific battle, but our gallant commander sunk the rebel gunboat in 60 minutes.

Our ancestors were home builders. They came to this valley and together with the Hoovers, Jenks, Carmalts, and others they cleared the forests and these fields in this beautiful valley and surrounding hills and then planted their corn and sowed their grain. They did their part in the great drama of life, then the Giver of All Good Gifts sent down His sunshine 93 millions of miles through space and the life-giving sunbeams entered the bosom of old mother earth and awoke these little germs of life and soon ten thousand miracles were wrought. It was not long until was seen the corn upon the hillside, the grain waving in the valleys, the cattle on the surrounding hills and the luscious fruit of the tree and vine.

Truly, when man does his part our Divine Father is ever ready to do His part in the great drama of life.

We need not be ashamed of our part in the great drama of life. We have done our share of making our glorious Republic the brightest gem inthe diadem of nations. Let us go forth in the coming future, fighting the battles of purity, sobriety and honor, until our hands are loosened from the handles of the plow, and when we turn and look back over the furrows we have made we will feel proud that the good work is still going on.”

Noted events in his life were:

  • He had a residence. 1629-Plymouth(Freeman 1632-33); Marshfield 1641; died 1672 in Salem MA
  • He was employed. Joiner; Carpenter; Cabinet Maker, Coffin Maker; Planter; shipping business; Designer And Builder Of Fine Furniture In Early Colony; Some Pieces Preserved In Metropolitan Museum. In the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford CT there is a so-called Prine-Howes Plymouth cupboard thought to have been made by Kenelm Winslow assisted by John Alden. Winslow and Alden lived until 1672 and surely worked together
  • Misc: Considered A Founding Father ( Surviving Settler) Of New Plymouth; not in 1627 division but freeman 1632; engaged in the settlement of Yarmouth and other towns
  • Land Purchase: Freetown, Bristol County, Mass. Bought lot 24 but never lived there Land went to son Nathaniel then his son Josiah who lived there until death in April 3, 1761. Josiah built the dam in the year 1695 and located a saw mill on this property.
  • K Winslow Homestead: 1645, Marshfield Mass. House was built around 1645 Kenelm obtained 100 acre land grant March 5, 1637. member of the Marshfield military company; representative of General Court 1649-1653;

Kenelm married Eleanor “Immigrant” Newton in Jun 1634 in Freetown, Plymouth, Mass. Eleanor was born about 1598 in England, died on Dec 5, 1681 in Marshfield, Plymouth, Mass, and was buried on Dec 5, 1681 in Marshfield, Mass.

General Notes: Mrs. Ellen Newton arrived at Plymouth abt. July 10, 1623 on the “Anne”, Wm. Pierce, Master (Banks: “English Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrims”; also, Banks: “Planters of the Commonwealth”; also, Bradford: “History of Plimoth Plantation, I, 314-). She subsequently m. John Adams who died in 1633. In June, 1634, she m. Kenelm Winslow (“Family of John Adams of Plymouth”, NEHGR 33:410).

Came to Plymouth on the ship “Anne” July 1623 the Anne was the second (or third, unclear) ship to the Plymouth Colony and also bore the wives and children of many of the settlers. The ship Anne arrived in Plymouth in July, 1623 accompanied by the Little James, bringing new settlers along with many of the wives and children that had been left behind in Leyden when the Mayflower departed in 1620. Married John Adams in 1625

© Edward K. & Mildred True, and James D. True

Last Update March 3, 2001.

We know that in English Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers by Charles E. Banks, she was called Mrs. Ellen Newton, widow, when at age 25, in the year 1623, she emigrated from England to America on the ship Anne. By the time of the 1627 division of land and cattle in Plymouth, MA, she was married to John Adams who came from England to Plymouth, MA, in the Fortune in 1621. John Adams died in 1633 leaving his widow, Ellen, and at least one son, James Adams.

Internet genforum note from Wm Baker– Elinor was in fact a Worden. She was the daughter of Peter Worden Ist, by his first wife. See my comments posted 2/12/00 for details. I do not know who she traveled with. It is a very good question. Newton was her first husband . Elinor ‘Newton’ Winslow who came on the “Anne” in 1623 was the daughter of Peter Worden Ist (of Yarmouth) by his first marriage. Her son Kenelm Winslow, Jr. married her brother Peter (II) Worden’s daughter Mercy Worden. That is why Kenelm (Jr.) referred to his wife as “my cousin” in his will. They were first cousins. Peter Worden II married Mary Magdalene Winslow, sister of Edward II and Kenelm I. Peter II and Mary were the parents of Mercy Worden who married Kenelm II. then a rebuttal I don’t believe that Ellen (—) (Newton) (Adams) Winslow was a daughter of Peter Worden. She was certainly a passenger on the Anne in 1623 as Ellen Newton. Most people think that she must have been married because no single woman would have made the journey alone. In any case she is generally considered the same person who married John Adams then Kenelm Winslow. See Robert Charles Anderson “The Great Migration Begins; Immigrants to New England 1620-1633” Vol. 1 (NEHGS, Boston, 1995) 1:11-12, 2:1332, 3:2033-2036.

Peter Worden, the one who came to Yarmouth, MA, left a will in which he mentions only his son–no daughters, no other kinspeople. He also mentions land he owns in Clayton, Lancashire, England. The Winslows were from Worcestershire. I doubt Mary/Magdalene Winslow went all the way to Lancashire to marry. Another reason this doesn’t work is that Magdalene Winslow did marry and stay in England was the grandmother of William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury!

Sometimes things are lost forever and the identity of Ellen (–) (Newton) (Adams) Winslow is one of those things. From Winslow Memorial–KENELM WINSLOW [1], married Eleanor Adams, widow of John Adams of Plymouth. Judge Davis supposes her maiden surname was Newton, perhaps the Ellen Newton of the pilgrims. She is said to have had three children by her first husband, viz.: James, John, and Susan.

Noted events in her life were:

  • Misc: Considered A Founding Father ( Surviving Settler) Of New Plymouth.
  • She immigrated in 1623 to On The Anne.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 2 M  i. Job Winslow was born in 1641 in Marshfield, Plymouth, Mass, died on Jul 14, 1720 in Freetown, Bristol, Mass, and was buried in Winslow Burial Ground, Freetown, Ma.

+ 3 F  ii. Elinor Winslow was born in 1637 in Plymouth, Mass, died on Aug 27, 1676 in Marshfield, Mass, and was buried in Winslow Cemetery, Marshfield, Plymouth, Massachusetts.

+ 4 M  iii. Kenelm Winslow was born on Apr 30, 1635 in Plymouth, Massachusetts, died on Nov 11, 1715 in Harwich, Barnstable, Mass, and was buried in Winslow Cemetery, Dennis, Barnstable, Massachusetts.

+ 5 M  iv. Nathaniel Winslow was born in 1639 in Marshfield, Mass, died on Dec 1, 1719 in Marshfield, Mass, and was buried in Winslow Cemetery, Marshfield, Plymouth, Massachusetts.